Category Archives: reconstructions

As I’ve mentioned a while before, there’s no such thing as the perfect textile replica. Well, theoretically, there might be – but really getting it all perfect, down to the fibre and thread and exact measurements? That would mean a … Continue reading

Posted in Bernuthsfeld Man, reconstructions | Leave a comment

There are so, so many open questions left around the man found in the Bernuthsfeld bog. Who was he? What was his job, if he had one? He definitely wasn’t rich, but how poor was he? There’s also plenty of … Continue reading

Posted in reconstructions, togs from bogs | Leave a comment

You might remember that a while ago, I posted about having a project for a reproduction of the tunic worn by the man from Bernuthsfeld. Well, it’s time to get the project into the next stage – which means I’m … Continue reading

Posted in Bernuthsfeld Man, reconstructions, togs from bogs | 3 Comments

There’s some more progress on the Bernuthsfeld project, though it is all but spectacular – pre-wash documentation of the fabrics, and subsequently washing, drying, and documenting them again. That documentation would mostly not be strictly necessary, but I couldn’t resist … Continue reading

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The work is all done and finished – the last of the fabrics has been cut into and stitched up into a hood. And while I was really happy that everything was done and finished and I could send it … Continue reading

Posted in reconstructions, spinning, work-related | 2 Comments

The fabric turned out wonderfully after being fulled – soft and lush and beautiful. It also surprised me a lot. It’s a fourshaft twill, which means every thread goes over two and under two, staggered to give diagonal lines. In … Continue reading

Posted in museum projects, reconstructions, spinning | 4 Comments

The last of the fabrics for the project has arrived – a 2/2 twill woven from the same yarns as the previous plainweave fabric. It’s now hanging out to dry after being fulled just like the others… and it’s beautiful. … Continue reading

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