Category Archives: textile techniques and tools

Now that it’s warm outside again, and there has been some rain, it’s time again to clean some wool… and I’m beyond excited that I managed to get my hands on another rare breed’s fleeces: I now have Waldschaf wool! … Continue reading

Posted in textile techniques and tools, work-related | 3 Comments

One of the recurring questions about my spindle sticks, especially from modern spinners, is “Why don’t they have a hook?” followed by “why don’t they have a notch?” and “how do you fix the yarn without hook or notch?” Finds … Continue reading

Posted in all the gory details, archaeology, spinning, textile techniques and tools, the market stall | 2 Comments

So, after finding out that my drawing skills are indeed horrible, let’s look a bit more at diverse instances of yarnwinders in actual historical artwork. Images of yarnwinders are not that straightforward to find, so I’ve been using the yarnwinder … Continue reading

Posted in all the gory details, textile techniques and tools | 2 Comments

Let’s start out with taking a closer look at the yarnwinder with the perpendicular arms. This is how it looks when yarn is wound onto it: As you can see, it sort of looks like a V-shape made by the … Continue reading

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One of the many interesting things made out of wood and related to textile work are yarnwinders. One style is rather well known and still in use today – it’s what is usually called a niddy-noddy. The design is very … Continue reading

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If you’ve ever done a spinning demonstration, you will probably have heard the Sleeping Beauty question at least once. If I had a Euro for every time that I’ve heard it… well, I’d be a good bit richer than I … Continue reading

Posted in spinning, textile techniques and tools | 2 Comments

Apart from the work on the Bernuthsfeld tunic, I’m also preparing for my bit of programme for the European Textile Forum, which is drawing closer and closer. In the usual mix of optimism (“I can do that! In time! No … Continue reading

Posted in tablet weaving, textile techniques and tools | 3 Comments