Category Archives: textile techniques and tools

I still have a fairly large selection of spindle whorls hanging out here, but some weight classes are running low, and especially the disc-shaped whorls are almost gone again. Which means it’s time to go into the basement, fetch the … Continue reading

Posted in textile techniques and tools, work-related | 2 Comments

Here’s a stack of things you might find amusing or interesting – or at least I hope so: There is a woven and embroidered Game Of Thrones tapestry, modeled after the famous Bayeux original. While the base design was made … Continue reading

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The workshop planning for the tablet-weaving is finally, finally finished. I’ve done a testrun on Wednesday, with three lovely ladies volunteering to be my guinea pigs for trying out the concept and the materials – and it was a good … Continue reading

Posted in tablet weaving, textile techniques and tools, workshops | 5 Comments

So now the loom model is done, and I’m quite happy with it, and here’s picture proof of how it looks with the natural shed open: and the artificial shed open: And did I mention that it is ridiculously easy … Continue reading

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The next thing that I sort of dreaded: the spacer chain. For many, many years, I had answered all questions about whether or not I knit with “No, I don’t, that is too modern for me!” and the same is … Continue reading

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It’s been a while since we had scale issues, right? So it might be time for the next instance of these. And the shed should be a nice place for them… I already mentioned that the shed might need to … Continue reading

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A loom with a front and back layer of threads is nice and fine, but a single shed not a weaving makes, or so. Which means… heddles. Now in the very first, quickly-thrown-together setup, I had done a very, very … Continue reading

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