Category Archives: textile techniques and tools

So now the loom model is done, and I’m quite happy with it, and here’s picture proof of how it looks with the natural shed open: and the artificial shed open: And did I mention that it is ridiculously easy … Continue reading

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The next thing that I sort of dreaded: the spacer chain. For many, many years, I had answered all questions about whether or not I knit with “No, I don’t, that is too modern for me!” and the same is … Continue reading

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It’s been a while since we had scale issues, right? So it might be time for the next instance of these. And the shed should be a nice place for them… I already mentioned that the shed might need to … Continue reading

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A loom with a front and back layer of threads is nice and fine, but a single shed not a weaving makes, or so. Which means… heddles. Now in the very first, quickly-thrown-together setup, I had done a very, very … Continue reading

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Next step for the loom setup was getting the weights… and there’s another thing that does not scale down easily. I had looked for typical weight per thread numbers, but a quick search did not give me any conclusive data, … Continue reading

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The miniature model loom is set up, and functioning, and it was a really fascinating project to do – plus I’m really, really happy with the result. Which looks like this: Setup took quite a long time – as was … Continue reading

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Well, what do you do once you have made a box loom? Try it out, of course. So I’ve been test-weaving some more, again with silk and gold… and by now, it’s become a fairly long band: …so long that … Continue reading

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