Category Archives: archaeology

There’s a lot of wonderful colleagues in my field (and it’s a small field, so you get to know most of them after a while). One of them is Eva Andersson Strand, who has been doing textile archaeology for a … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, spinning, textile techniques and tools | 1 Comment

Something that has happened to me time and again: I look at some medieval Thing. I sort of try to figure out how it was made. I read up on more details of the Thing, and the Type of Things. … Continue reading

Posted in all the gory details, archaeology, the market stall, work-related | Leave a comment

Here’s more impressions from Lauresham: First of all, the vinyard: This time of year, everything was full of wild flowers, too. Of course it’s not only fields and pastures and vinyard – there are the houses as well, which I … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, museums, Textilforum | 2 Comments

… but they are both to spectacular things. Number one: A one thousand year old sarcophagus was opened in Mainz – here is the link to a short video report (in German). Number two is more textile-related stuff: A report … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, books, museums | Leave a comment

If you’re interested in horses, horse breeding, or ancient DNA studies, here’s a paper posted on academia.edu about ancient horse DNA – discovering two now-extinct horse lineages, as well as proof that mules were already bred and used more than … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Internet resources | Leave a comment

One of the things on my list of things I would like to do is make a short overview article about the sources for the different kinds of goods I carry – for myself, for the crafters who make these … Continue reading

Posted in all the gory details, archaeology, textile techniques and tools | Leave a comment

Here are a few things for the German readers among you – with one bonus English article, so I’ll start with that one: A woman from a medieval monastery close to Paderborn has been identified as a scribe through blue … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, conferences, Living History | 1 Comment