Category Archives: textile techniques and tools

The V&A has a nice film with English subtitles on natural dyeing in Japan – which is well worth taking a look at just for the beautifully coloured silk fabrics moving in the wind right at the beginning of the … Continue reading

Posted in textile techniques and tools | 3 Comments

Now that it’s warm outside again, and there has been some rain, it’s time again to clean some wool… and I’m beyond excited that I managed to get my hands on another rare breed’s fleeces: I now have Waldschaf wool! … Continue reading

Posted in textile techniques and tools, work-related | 3 Comments

One of the recurring questions about my spindle sticks, especially from modern spinners, is “Why don’t they have a hook?” followed by “why don’t they have a notch?” and “how do you fix the yarn without hook or notch?” Finds … Continue reading

Posted in all the gory details, archaeology, spinning, textile techniques and tools, the market stall | 2 Comments

So, after finding out that my drawing skills are indeed horrible, let’s look a bit more at diverse instances of yarnwinders in actual historical artwork. Images of yarnwinders are not that straightforward to find, so I’ve been using the yarnwinder … Continue reading

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Let’s start out with taking a closer look at the yarnwinder with the perpendicular arms. This is how it looks when yarn is wound onto it: As you can see, it sort of looks like a V-shape made by the … Continue reading

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One of the many interesting things made out of wood and related to textile work are yarnwinders. One style is rather well known and still in use today – it’s what is usually called a niddy-noddy. The design is very … Continue reading

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If you’ve ever done a spinning demonstration, you will probably have heard the Sleeping Beauty question at least once. If I had a Euro for every time that I’ve heard it… well, I’d be a good bit richer than I … Continue reading

Posted in spinning, textile techniques and tools | 2 Comments