Category Archives: all the gory details

The ink, according to the recipe I was using, is finished – and the result is a very dark liquid with a blueish tinge, much darker than I’d expected. That might be due to my making a very small amount … Continue reading

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I’m doing a little test run on the ink before making a larger batch – and since that involves interesting stuff, you might want to enjoy some pictures of it… It all starts with the oak galls – in my … Continue reading

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Time for some links again! If you like books, and old things, you might be delighted by the item that the Bodleian acquired a while ago, and which is now featured in a display – a 15th century book coffer, … Continue reading

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I’ve gotten involved in a project, sort of, and that led to my finally stocking up on silk colours for the embroidery silks – emptying out the remainder of the undyed silk stock that I had left. Somehow, this seems … Continue reading

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…a-changing. Things, in my case. I have mentioned that there has to be some iron gall ink making to be done – which also involves portioning that ink and packing it into suitable vessels. Back when I ordered the first … Continue reading

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I’ve run out of iron gall ink now, so it’s time to get some more… or, to put it better, to make some more. Last time, I had a colleague make my batch, but as she’s not working anymore, I … Continue reading

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One of the things on my list of things I would like to do is make a short overview article about the sources for the different kinds of goods I carry – for myself, for the crafters who make these … Continue reading

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